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Old 2015-10-25, 04:13 PM   #53
Warcry
Likes Beast Wars toys. A lot.
 
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Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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Favourite episodes, huh? Okay, I'll play.

I haven't seen TOS in it's entirety in ages, so it's entirely possible I'm forgetting something. But out of the episodes I actually remember my favourite would have to be The Galileo Seven. It's one of the best Spock episodes out there, and Spock is easily my favourite from the show. I also love that we actually got to know a few of the redshirts a bit. The plot on the planet's surface with the funny aliens, along with Spock's struggles to deal with the situation logically, have always made this one super-memorable to me.

The Tholian Web is also really stuck in my head, but I don't think I've actually seen it since I was little so it might actually be terrible (I used to love The Arena when I was little but could barely get through it a couple years ago).

From TNG, there are so many episodes that I love, but paridoxically it's an easy choice. As much as I love episodes like Yesterday's Enterprise, The Best of Both Worlds, Family, The Wounded, Darmok, Chain of Command, Face of the Enemy, The Pegasus, Lower Decks, etc., I don't think any of them quite stand up to The Measure Of A Man. On top of all the philosophical questions about "personhood" that it grapples with (which are super-important in and of themselves), the episode also manages to be the first really good vehicle for Picard the man (as opposed to Picard the steely captain). When I rewatch the series this is always the episode where my opinion of Picard switches from "one dimensional pompous stiff" to "fatherly leader", as I watch him get angrier and angrier over a bigot who's trying to essentially vivisect a member of his family. His reunion with Louvois also helps quite a bit with making him feel like a real person.

Guinan's short scene with Picard is just about the best thing to happen all season, too. I always forget how vital she was to the show's best years until I rewatch an episode with her in it.

Although DS9 is my favourite series, honestly nothing about the show before The Jem'Hadar is memorable to me in the slightest. After that, though, I've got so many favourites it's hard to pick. In general I think the Dominion arc was handled wonderfully and I love a lot of episodes that dealt with it. The first is probably Improbable Cause/The Die Is Cast, which firmly cemented Garak as an important part of the series rather than an occasional guest star. These events were also the point of no return for the over-arching Dominion plot -- once this happened, you knew war was inevitable. In Purgatory's Shadow/By Inferno's Light was great too, introducing the real Martok and making Worf out to be even more badass than he'd ever managed through the whole run of TNG. Call to Arms was a huge shocker, and I remember being super stoked after seeing the closing shot of the huge Federation war fleet at the end. And then then first episode of season six were an even bigger shock, as it slowly sunk in that, no, the status quo wouldn't be restored by the end of the premiere. And then the whole run of episodes after that, up to Sacrifice of Angels, was one hit after another. In the Pale Moonlight is probably the best of the war episodes after that, though Siege of AR-558 was pretty powerful too. And then everything from Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges was intense enough that I nearly died of a heart attack as a kid.

But in spite of all that praise for the Dominion War, my favourite episodes don't really have anything to do with it. Homefront/Paradise Lost use changelings as an excuse, but the story is about something else entirely and it's one of those shows that seem to get more topical every year. It's a fantastic illustration of just how easy it is for a civilized nation to let fear take it to dark places, and I wish it was required viewing for anyone elected to government. But on top of the powerful message it carries it was also damned entertaining thanks to some fantastic acting that made Admiral Leyton, Jaresh-Inyo, Sisko's dad and even Captain Benteen highly memorable characters even though only one of them ever showed up again after this.

For the Uniform is also an enduring favourite, because it illustrates just how different Sisko is from all the other captains in the franchise. I also really like how the episode ends with Sisko saying that all his awful actions were just him "getting into character" to beat Eddington, but makes it clear at the same time that we shouldn't entirely believe that.

Voyager is also hard to choose from, though for different reasons. I was actually super-excited for the show when it started, but even though I was only ten or eleven when it premiered I was quickly disappointed by how the show didn't seem to live up to its premise (in particular I remember being super-excited by what Before and After seemed to promise, only for the later writers to pussy out, make it a two-parter and undo it afterwards). So while there was the occasional good episode scattered throughout the series -- Basics, Scorpion and The Killing Game all come to mind -- I actually think that the pilot, Caretaker, was as good as the series ever got. It set the show off on a very interesting direction, and it's just a shame that the rest of the series didn't follow it.

I'm not sure I can pick anything from Enterprise, though. Although I enjoyed the fourth season, nothing from it really stands out as all that good compared to the rest. Though the fact that I haven't watched it since it first aired probably contributes to that.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
He basically still looks the same now, it's just the way he moves and talks in a much slower (and by the sound of it, denchers) way that gives away the fact he's well into his 70's. It's much the same way that Christopher Lloyd, though looking surprisingly like old Doc Brown when he had the wig on, is clearly much more of a dodgery and forgetful old man than he ever played the character in that Jimmy Kimmel sketch from the middle of the week.
He's notably got an old man's jawline and neck now, with some obvious saggy skin (just take a look at his main pic on Wikipedia) but it's amazing how little he's changed since 1987, I agree.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Of course, Picard does have an intense sense of family pride (if he can trace his family back to Trafalgar--though why that would be something to be proud of for a French family I've no idea, you'd think the writers' thought he was English--an extra 100 years doesn't mean much), which makes the fact he's hearing about this for the first time and is surprised by it even funnier.
Maybe by "the Picard who fought at Trafalgar" he meant that one of his uncles got into a fistfight there on vacation?

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Get you, paying attention to dedication plaques. You nerd.
Well, to be perfectly honest I had to look it up.

I'm amazed they went to the trouble of making them up for all these one-shot guest ships, though. Nobody would have noticed if they hadn't bothered.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Modern navy carriers can have a long period of service, the real Enterprise as featured in Star Trek IV was on active duty for 50 years so super advanced starships managing another 30 isn't so far fetched.
That's fair enough, though an aircraft carrier isn't the best comparison -- its planes are what do all the fighting, and I'm sure the carrier Enterprise wasn't still flying F-4 Phantoms when they retired her in 2013. They'd be more akin to battleships and destroyers, which sometimes had lifespans that long but not very often.

I'm sure the spaceframes of ships like Lakota or Malinche or Hood were still perfectly serviceable, but considering the advancements that Starfleet made over the decade and a half run from TNG through the end of Voyager, you'd have to think that their basic systems were hopelessly obsolete.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
I do wonder what happened to the Constitution Class, they're the work horse of Star Fleet during the original series (there's not even a hint of them having another type of large ship), yet they almost completely vanish from the films onwards. The Enterprise herself is only twenty (though if Space Seed was 15 years earlier and The Cage 11 before that it's closer to 30 despite what Admiral man says) when they retire her, which seems positively young for a Federation ship and comes only a few years after a major and expensive refit.
That admiral was full of it, just based on the TV show. Based on background info, even moreso. After all, Robert April commanded the Enterprise before Pike, and she was apparently first commissioned two decades before the TV show. So she was closer to 40 by the time Search for Spock came along.

As far as what happened to them goes...well, I think it made it into dialogue in the original series that they was only a dozen of them in service, like the background info says. And they lost Constellation, Defiant and Intrepid during the run of the series, as well as potentially Excalibur and Hood as well (depending on how severe the damage from the M5 fiasco was). Even if they built a few more (you'd have to imagine they did, since Enterprise-A was a thing), it seems like the attrition rate for the class was pretty high.

We do see one still in service during TNG, or at least the debris or one after the Borg blew it to bits at Wolf 359. And apparently the Republic that gets mentioned as an Academy training ship in 'Valiant' was the old Constitution class ship as well (I guess it would have to be, since it was so archaic that it hadn't left the solar system in fifty years).

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
As powerful as the destruction of the original Defiant was, it's instant replacement with an identical ship (even down to the registration number! Speaking of which, I'd be willing to let the silliness of the "Add a letter to the end of 1701 for each new Enterprise" pass despite it making no sense for any logical registry system if not for the fact the Yamato--and only the first time we saw her--was the only other Federation ship we ever saw do the same despite the constant reuse of ship names) was a pretty bad fumbled moment.
I think the new Defiant's registry number was supposed to be different, only they reused a bunch of CGI shots with the old ship's numbers and made things really confusing.

Can't disagree about the Enterprise's registry, either. By that logic the Hood, Excalibur, Defiant, Yorktown, Lexington, Farragut, Intrepid, etc. should all have had their TOS-era registry plus a letter. I mean, heck, by that logic the TOS Enterprise should have been "NX-01-A"...

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Along with the Breen basically adding nothing to the final arc beyond a new gun either the Cardassians or Dominion could have developed themselves (all those hints and mysteries basically come to nothing. All they contribute is pissing of Damar).
Yeah, it's a shame that the Breen didn't show up a bit sooner so they could get a bit more development. All they really did was serve as a wedge between the Cardassians and the Dominion. It could have been the Pakleds or Yridians for all it mattered.

I did like the mysteries they wove about them but it was a shame we never saw them resolved (though obviously Kira knows what they look like since she stole one's clothes).

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Oh, and the way the two plots of What You Leave Behind don't connect to each other at all so you have oddities like the fact Winn would have to be standing of Dukat's dead body chanting for days whilst she's waiting for the war plot to end.
That did sort of feel like an obligatory "oh shit, we'd better wrap up the Prophets arc too!" storyline, didn't it? It's also disappointing to see Winn go full-on evil instead of her usual brand of self-serving "what's best for me is best for Bajor" justifications.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
I actually really liked the Borg episode as well. It did something similar to what Doctor Who would do with Daleks when it came back a few years later, restoring the power and threat to a much diminished enemy by just showing how dangerous and scary just a couple (or one in the Dalek case) can be. The fact they quickly assimilate their way up to having a ship nearly the equal of the NX01 and very clearly would have surpassed it if they'd have just a little more time gives them a lot of their teeth back.
Yeah, that was probably the first really good use of the Borg since the first Voyager episode that featured them. They make great once- or twice-a-show guest baddies, but seeing them defeated five or more times per season really stripped away all of their sense of menace.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
That's basically what they did again, much more successfully, with the Dominion isn't it? Their pressence is built up slowly over season 2 (amusingly starting with a comedy Ferengi episode).
I dunno, I think they did too good a job of it in DS9 -- insofar as I didn't even realize they were doing it until I rewatched it again after the fact. I don't know how many people would have picked up on it the first time through.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
Wasn't he keen on the Ferengi having massive cocks? Says it all really.
I've never heard that, but it says a lot about latter-day Roddenberry that I don't doubt it at all.

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Originally Posted by inflatable dalek View Post
They do seem to have been very worried that the TV uniforms wouldn't stand up on the cinema screen (and you can see the zip in the back a lot more often in HD. Though as they obviously join up on the back anyway even when you can't see the zip I've often wondered how the characters were supposed to put them on without help), much as there was with the sets.
If I remember right, in-universe the jackets zip up the front using Magic Future Fasteners and we're just supposed to pretend the zippers aren't there.

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Originally Posted by Tetsuro View Post
So did I, but then, Nemesis couldn't even be bothered to remember that Picard hadn't always been bald either.
Yeah, I remember that line and took it the same way as you guys, like a "yeah this is great, but nobody else can have it because it belongs to the hippies" rather than "we gotta help the hippies even if it means I lose this". I mean, that's not how biology works. Eyes don't magically go away. If you have them you have them.
 
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