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Old 2014-08-30, 02:18 PM   #61
inflatable dalek
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Now I'm on a '90's Brit pop kick I've gone and gotten Space's greatest hits as well.

Despite all having more hits than I suspect most people would remember (though from looking at Wikipedia in some cases we're defining hit as "Top 60", I suspect it's more a case of "Every single we put out") but I recognised more of them than I did on the Catatonia album in a "I totally forgot this existed but now I'm glad I remember" way.

Though Deadliest of the Species is their best remembered song, I always liked this one:


 
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Old 2014-08-31, 08:02 AM   #62
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Thats from second album 'Tin Planet', isn't it?

Speaking of Britpop, my local music festival 'Bingley Live' has had a few acts on from Britpop's heyday - Shed Seven (always a good live band) , Ocean Colour Scene (started life as baggy chancers before turning into Paul Weller's backing band for the 'Wild Wood' tour - the modfather's influence runs deep in their unimaginative '60s pastiche) and Gaz Coombes (off of Supergrass). A line up which has bugger all to do with current trends and relevance, but a rather sad indictment of today's fractured music scene that twenty year old second string Britpop acts are seen as a more bankable draw than some of today's bright young things.

I bought a recent Britpop compliation CD 'Britpop At The BBC' which - usual suspects aside - has a rather lovely disc full of Evening Session er, sessions full of stripped down live versions of stuff from Pulp, Manic Street Preachers, The Auteurs and - cheeringly - Gorky's Zygotic Mynci (these welsh psychaedelics are bloody brilliant and well worth checking out for anyone whom likes this eras more interesting diversions). Frankly, I'd have loved a triple CD* of these rather than another compliation of heard it all before Britpop staples.

*Perhaps a reissued and expanded version of the old Evening Session compliation album that came out circa 1996 - which is a much better snapshot of the era, picking up some of the lesser-known acts as well as the headliners.
 
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Old 2014-09-14, 01:29 PM   #63
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Couple of odds and sods from the early '90s again...tg replace some sadly deceased vinyl of mine...

The The 'Dusk' (1992) - final 'proper' album from the one time polemic Matt Johnson. This album beefs up their usual, acoustic musings thanks to the input of Johnny Marr and The Grid's Richard Norris. If I'm honest, I bought this solely for the single 'dogs of lust', which whilst not as 'right on' as their '80s oeuvre is a thumpingly good tune.

Dinosaur Jr 'Where You Been?' (1993) - Minor radio hit 'start choppin' ' aside, this is a marvellous little fuzzy rock album from full time stoner J Mascis. He's probably not really, but with his slightly sleeply drawl and that, he doesn't do much to disuade you otherwise.

Sonic Youth 'Dirty' (1992) - True SY fans will point to 'Goo' as the definitive SY album and the one to go to, but I've always been massively fond of this record. It goes on for ages, the songs sound like someone farting about in scrapyard, but its just somehow great because of this. And I adore 'Sugar Cane' off this. Brilliant.
 

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Old 2014-09-18, 09:27 PM   #64
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Some more under 20p bargains from second hand b*st*rds Zoverstocks (the secret identity of Music Magpie):

U2 'Zooropa' (1993) - Long before they turned into a bunch of tax-avoiding so and so's paid millions by Apple to do an album they can give away 'free', U2 were a bloated stadium rock band. At least they were by the late 1980s, after starting life as an interesting shouty post-punk outfit. The early 1990s saw U2 arguably at their creative peak with this album and predecessor 'Achtung Baby' which saw them strip away the bloated waffle you associate with stadium rock for something that was much more lively. These are also the only U2 records I can really get into. 'Zooropa' for all it is feted by taste makers, just begs and borrows from the dance-rock and techno-rock leanings of Primal Scream and Jesus Jones, contemporaries of this era whom also latched onto the meshing of dance rhythms to rock guitars. The album itself was rather overshadowed by the tour that supported it, but in the likes of 'Lemon' and the outstanding 'Numb' it very much has the feel of a band who've earned their cash and are doing something interesting with their music. Shame they followed this up 'Discotheque' before lurching into AOR.
 
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Old 2014-09-18, 09:51 PM   #65
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Guardians of the Galaxy soundtrack. Hooked on a Feeling was a personal favorite for a very long time, and the opportunity to own it on something other than cassette was too good to pass up.
 
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Old 2014-09-21, 06:50 PM   #66
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Madness - Divine Madness (1992)

It's hard to remember what an impact this had on Madness' career. In common with a lot of '80s music since the rise of Acid House, Rave culture, Shoe Gazing and Grunge, Madness had been swept away and largely forgotten (not helped, it has to be said by their ill-judged stint as 'The Madness' c.1988). This compilation landed and seemed to jog the nation's memory to the extent that the inaugural 'Madstock' was announced becoming a semi-regular event throughout the '90s that eventually saw the band writing and recording again (and Suggs launching a solo career). This compilation featured all their hits from 1979 - 1986 and was a reminder of what cracking tunes - and fun - Madness were. I like the vaudeville aspect and slightly haunting nature of a lot their songs and am particularly fond of their later stuff on here, 'The Sun And The Rain', 'Michael Caine', 'Uncle Sam' and '(Waiting For The) Ghost Train' which proved Madness had more to offer than jolly japes. The accompanying video compilation was a favourite of mine - especially for the extra tracks ('Bed And Breakfast Man' and their singles released as The Madness), Japanese Honda City Turbo (hello Skids and Crosscut!) adverts, vox pops and 'where are they now?' segments

The La's - The La's (1990)

Oddly an album that passed me by at the time, ubiquitous single 'There She Goes' notwithstanding and one I've always been a bit put off by (in much the same way I was with The Stone Roses debut) - due to its constant praise and the legend that has surrounded it, with frontman Lee Mavers' singular pursuit of sound ensuring that this album took forever to come out and that The La's slowly faded away. And f**k me, if it isn't genuinely a very impressive record. 'T.S.G' and its Byrds-like jangle really isn't a good advert for the La's whom have created one of the most forward looking guitar pop albums I've ever heard. This has impressed me way more than other more lauded efforts in this sphere. Hooray for being surprised
 
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Old 2014-09-21, 08:56 PM   #67
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I love your CD reviews Skyquake, you should be a music jour no. 'Baggy chancers' and 'unimaginative '60s pastiche' made me chuckle particularly. I was a bit of a closet Shed Seven fan, and Bluetones too. A lot of Britpop I didn’t get into until after its phase had been supplanted, same with Stone Roses and that. Now I’m all a bit electronic, but these things come in fits and starts, and its fun to read reviews like yours and suddenly be reminded; “I should really go get some Auteurs stuff”.
 
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Old 2014-09-22, 01:40 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Slag View Post
I love your CD reviews Skyquake, you should be a music jour no.
Seconded. You clearly know your stuff, and they're fun to read even if I don't know what the hell you're talking about.
 
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Old 2014-09-22, 09:35 PM   #69
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Aww thanks guys

I like music. And am fascinated by the stuff I grew up with and impacted on me. I will, at some point get into some more '80s stuff. But with second hand stuff from the '90s and beyond being a pittance, that's what I'm buying the most of at the moment (its kind of hard to lay down 5 on a secondhand Yazoo album when I can buy a pile of '90s tat for the same money!).

Jakatta - 'Visions' (2002)

Honestly, I bought this for 'American Dream' (you'll know that when you hear it - its the one that samples the score from American Beauty) and wouldn't you know it, its a motif that runs through the ENTIRE album. The rest of the record bubbles along somewhere between chill out and house music. It also features Seal (not that you'd know). It's one of those dance music to do the ironing too records, its inoffensive stuff and proof again that not all dance artistes can turn one hit single into an album.

Stereo MCs - 'Deep Down & Dirty' (2001)

One of my favourite telly moments ever is watching Stereo MCs perform lead single (and title track) 'Deep Down & Dirty' on CD:UK. Front man Rob Birch has always looked like he's been sleeping rough whilst taking all the drugs, and seeing him jumping around and looking like a raggedy scarecrow baffling the children in the audience was just brilliant. And they were great too. The album is a great shuffly hip-hop record with dancey bits in and feels grimey and seedy in a way that, well, Grime doesn't. I was actually surprised to see them again, after they disappeared into the long grass after dropping 'Connected' back in 1992. Sadly, after a brief flurry of activity in the early 2000s (including a mix album), the Stereo MCs have crawled back under whatever rock they crawled out of, which is a shame.

Pearl Jam 'Ten' - (1992)

I want to like Pearl Jam. I like the singles off this album ('Alive' and 'Jeremy' and, er the other one) but the rest of it is just so forgettable and their songs are so bloody long! No wonder I got into Stone Temple Pilots, whom do exactly the same thing, but with much more welly (and also with a frontman with a crippling drugs problem that frequently derails both his career and that of anyone involved with him). They've turned into a bunch of super earnest 'Classic Rock' types these days, churning out worthy albums. Still not of much interest to me.
 
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Old 2014-09-23, 02:45 AM   #70
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At a second-hand store, I saw a solo album by Fred Schneider for $2. I thought, "B-52s have a good album, and Fred Schneider's fun to impersonate. How bad can this be?"


I want my $2 back. I skipped past the first couple tracks halfway into each song on the very first listen, and haven't even finished listening to the whole album. It's all the obnoxious and annoying parts of B-52s without the fun or charm. Inane lyrics, boring and repetitive riffs, poor production, and just an overall irritating album. The only thing I like about it so far is the cover art looks to be a grade-school picture of Fred Schneider, and the title is "Just Fred". But I could have saved $2 and just giggled at the cover in the store.

On the plus side, this album did not make me yell "Stop it!" at the radio like I did the time I accidentally bought a Cardigans album.
 
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Old 2014-10-01, 10:31 AM   #71
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God, The B-52s...that takes me back. An interesting and kooky band for many years (c'mon, an album built around the rise and fall of Mesopotania?) before it all went wrong and they ended their career with a rubbish cover of the Flintstones theme for the risable live action film. And fancy Fred Schneider turning out an album best described as irritating...

The Darling Buds 'Pop Said' (1988) as indie music finally stepped out of the shadow of The Smiths (whom cast such a long shadow in the '80s that everyone wanted to be like them. And sound like them, as NMEs 'legendary' C86 cassette will attest) , some rather magnificent guitar pop emerged that caught the attention of the major labels. The Darling Buds are one such band, with their chirpy, upbeat pop which is arguably superior to The Primitives whom had minor chart success with a similar sound. Great stuff.

Placebo 'Without You I'm Nothing' (1998) A sort of bridging album between their early glam punk and their 'goth' phase that was to come with 'Taste In Men'. Best song on this is the superb 'Pure Morning', which unfortunately opens the album. Everything else is pretty forgettable after that, with just various shades of Brian Molko's signature whine to tell you you're listening to a different song. Shame.


And on the news this morning, I learnt that music videos in the UK are now going to have film style classification certificates, after the constant groundswell of moral outrage by concerned parents have forced the industry to do something about it because, God forbid, you can't expect parents to do all the parenting and police the technology their give their infants.

Amusingly, only two labels have thus far signed up for this in the UK and no US labels have expressed an interest in this. Which, funnily enough, is where a lot of the outrage stems from. Miley Cyrus wiggling about in the buff, Nicki Minaj in her-non-too subtle Anaconda video, whatever misogynist rapey video rappers are peddling this week are all beamed in from The Land Of The Free (which, lest we forget, gave us the excellent 'Parental Advisory' label which had the inverse effect it was intended to do as well as censored versions of albums available in chains like Wal Mart), which leaves the UK's offering looking prudent by comparison (Jessie J in trouble because the video for her number 1 features fully clothed ladies dancing and wiggling their bums) - what was our last 'outrageous' music video? The Prodigy's 'Smack My Bitch Up'. And that was in 1998. Hooray!

Great interview on BBC Breakfast about this with John Robb (music journalist and frontman in Gold Blade) and upset middle class parent whom said the immortal words "speaking as a parent".
 
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Old 2014-10-26, 09:01 AM   #72
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Tra- La! I have bought some records!

Evil Scarecrow 'Galactic Hunt' (2014)

Evil Scarecrow are proper brilliant. A very silly metal band with songs about robots, Godzilla and being a miserable goth is ('my makeup runs/ my eyes grow sore'). They are one of the best live bands I've ever seen and if you haven't seen them , then you should! They ruled Bloodstock this year with their infectious enthusiasm for heavy metal and how silly it all is and had the entire crowd scuttling like crabs for 'Crabulon' (included in this here album). Galactic Hunt is their third album, and like 2008's Sixty Six Minutes Past Six, contains a joyful mix of nonsense underpinned by some serious technical ability that stops the affair being the sort of 'funny for one listen' of a lot of 'comedy' bands. The difference this time is that the songs are sharper and louder (helped in no part by the excellent production afforded by Russ Russell), and the album holds together a lot better than their previous efforts. Here, obvious fun stuff like Crabulon, Rise and ode to awesome 1980s VR/Fantasy roleplay childrens telly Enter The Knightmare, sits alongside the more whimsical Dance Of The Cyclops and the prog-metal pretensions of Book Of Doom and Flight Of The Dragons without any of the songs dominating over the others. Jolly good fun!

Marmozets 'The Weird And Wonderful' (2014)
Bright young things from just down the road from me in Bingley, West Yorkshire with a frighteningly good debut album. To look at, you're half expecting some sort of Paramore-a-like band, but Marmozets reveal themselves to be a much more interesting and ferocious proposition. They're all loud swaggering Mathcore jerks and twists complimented by Becca MacIntyre's awesome throat shredding bark. There's such life and punch in these tunes and not a dull moment on the album from start to finish. My favourites are the superb slithery throb of 'Move Shake Hide' and the angular and abrasive 'Vibetech'. Cracking.
 
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Old 2014-11-05, 07:50 PM   #73
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So hmv (yes, they're still going and I still shop there because I like my local hmv, the staff are all ace) have had a 'black parade' promtion going on throughout October which has brought a lot of old Goth, Metal and alternative records into a rarely seen sales promotion and I have bought up pretty much the entire display... so lets have a look, shall we..?

The Cramps 'Songs The Lord Taught Us' (1980)

Debut album from the band that pretty much invented Psychobilly, with its mix of '50s rock 'n' roll, Link Wray guitars and mix of B-movie horror films. Their debut album is a superb mix of fuzzed up creepy covers of forgotten rock 'n' roll standards, which effortlessly sit with their own original stuff, all of which sound like they are recorded inside a claustrophobic's worst nightmare.

The Damned 'Phantasmagoria' (1985)

Having split with Captain Sensible (whom was bothering the charts around this time with a cover of 'Happy Talking' from the Rogers & Hammerstein musical 'South Pacific' - now that's punk rock!) , The Damned plunged into full on Goth weirdness with this album. A savvy move, and one that has given them a longevity enjoyed by few other bands (they are currently on tour with Motorhead). Anyway, this is a pleasant surprise, I've not really paid much attention to The Damned, but this is great, great record. Whilst it plays with the usual morbid themes of 'Goth', its some how quite cheery and upbeat with it, no doubt due to the soaring sax that punctuates the entire album. And the slightly silly 'Grimly Fiendish'. A good antidote to the po-faced likes of The Mission and Fields Of The Nephilim.

Echo And The Bunnymen 'Ocean Rain' (1984)

Best band to come out of Liverpool since the Beatles? Quite possibly, and this sparkling gem of a record is a strong argument in their favour. I love how lush and dreamlike this sounds, and feels more like a soundtrack to Wuthering Heights than er, 'Wuthering Heights'.

Killing Joke 'Laugh? I Nearly Bought One' (1992)

Tight as you like run through of Killing Joke's singles from 1979 - 1990, with some live odds and sods thrown in. I love Killing Joke. They're a band I've only really discovered for myself in the last couple of years. Frontman Jaz Coleman is perhaps more Alan Parker - Urban Warrior than Mark Thomas, but I do like how angry and riled up they sound. And what a sound! A huge, clanking grimy mix of punk, dub and metal, easy to see why they're largely credited for developing the sound we now call 'Industrial'. They took the unlistenable dirge that Throbbing Gristle pioneered and hammered it into something far more intense and urgent. As a singles compilation, you're hard pressed to find a duff track on here, but for my money its 'Requiem', 'Follow The Leaders' and 'Eighties' that really get the pulse racing. Some nice commentary on the then privatization of the various utility companies towards the end of the album too.
 
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Old 2014-11-11, 09:02 AM   #74
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Motorhead 'Ace Of Spades ' (1980)

Brutal debut from Lemmy's lot that goes straight for the jugular with some fast and powerful metal. easy to see why they were so feted by the punks. They have that similar sort of chaotic ramalama speed of sound, but just, well, heavier. Aside from the titular title track, there's some further belters present in the form of 'Fast And Loose', 'Jailbait' and 'The Chase Is Better Than The Catch'. This 2004 re-release of the expanded 1996 reissue also contains Girlschool team up 'Please Don't Touch' which is also fantastic.

Siouxsie And The Banshees 'Juju' (1981)

Highly regarded fourth album from the Banshees that sees them delve into witchcraft and folklore for inspriation. For me, its new gituarist John McGeoch (formerly of Magazine) that makes this record. His superb classical flourishes that he brings to the likes of 'Spellbound' along with the urgency and intricacy of his playing really push the Banshees sound. Spookiness abounds elsewhere in 'Halloween', 'Night Shift' and the brooding 'Sin In My Heart'. Great stuff!

The Cure 'The Head On The Door' (1985)

Easily the most accessible of the Cure's many, many records. More serious music fans poo-poo this as one of the Cure's weaker albums, simply because of its more overt POP stylings, but I think its great. There's a lot to enjoy on here, with the singles 'In Between Days' and 'Close To You' being the obvious touchstones. There's also the impressive gems 'Kyoto Song' , 'The Baby Screams' and superb album closer 'Sinking' that belie the pop sheen of the record. A great starting point, if like me, you're unfamiliar with The Cure's tapestry of weirdness.
 
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Old 2014-11-20, 11:15 PM   #75
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Devin Townsend Project - 'Z2' (2014)

Metal's musical magpie returns from a recent dalliance with country music (no, really) to spaff out a double album that serves as both a follow up to 2012's 'Epicloud' and 2007's Ziltoid concept album (think War Of The Worlds, as if done by South Park's Terence and Phillip and you're there). Gotta be honest, although the Ziltoid album does have some decent tunes and a surprisingly engaging story,its stream of poo-related humour wears a little thin towards the end of the record (a bit like listening to Green Jelly's 'Sh*tman' on repeat). Better is the great big sonic overload of 'Z2 disc 1' as my phone charmingly titles it. Full of choirs, really really big widescreen sounds, nice lady singing, crunchy guitars and Devin's glass gargling growl. It's brilliant stuff, with not a dull moment from start to finish. Not quite sure why he paired these two albums together though. It's a bit like following The Beatles with Weird Al. Smells a bit like hedging your bets.
 
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Old 2014-11-21, 12:39 PM   #76
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So, Band Aid 30. Not a purchase but I thought it might be worth talking about.

Yes, it's a good cause and all, but it's a rather piss poor version of a song that only ever really worked out well the first time they did it, and going to the effort of changing the lyrics to reflect Ebola but leaving in the "Feed the world" chorus that's now nonsensical seems a bit odd.

I can't decide if I'm old for not having a clue who most of the people are, of if it's just a bunch of nonentities.






I am old.

Geldof came over as a complete tit in that Sky interview as well. Going "Give us your ****ing money!" when making an impassioned charity plea was fairly understandable and relatable. Going "Bollocks" to considered and serious questions when you don't actually have a good answer to any of the issues raised just makes you seem a dick doing a pale imitation of his 30 year old glories.

A bit like the song actually.
 
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Old 2014-11-21, 11:16 PM   #77
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TBH, you wouldn't recognize anyone from the 2008 version either. Or Band Aid II, for that matter.

I'd honestly prefer to give money directly to the ebola cause than shell out for this excerable dead horse flogging exercise... except there's more people dying of Malaria which is more easily treatable, but hey ho. Ebola is the cause du jour, so what would I know?

I think that Sky journalist was spot on - if all involved paid their taxes properly (U2 are notorious tax avoiders , if anyone's interested, taking advantage the usual Luxembourg shenanigans - how exactly does that fit with your responsibility towards your fellow man that you're constantly preaching, Bono?) there'd probably be enough money to wipe out poverty, feed the world and have some change to work on ebola vaccines. Assuming of course, governments spend the money wisely, and it doesn't end up in the hands of various grasping dictatorships, as is sadly the case for a lot of charity money raised for developing nations.

Its all very well to help a good cause, but not when so many involved could actually help more - hell, they could even use it as a tax write off like large companies do through their various community and charity projects they bung money at.

Saying "b*ll*cks" just makes you look like a c*nt.
 
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Old 2014-11-26, 10:28 AM   #78
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In other musical purchas news, rounding out my spooky goth purchases...

The Cult 'Love' (1985)

The albatross that is 'She Sells Sanctuary' (a fine, fine tune) dominates this album. Its a a bit of a shame because its such a solid record otherwise. There's just nothing else like 'Sanctuary' that really stands out. Of the rest, its 'Brother Wolf Sister Moon' that really grabs the attention.

The Sisters Of Mercy 'Floodland' (1987)

If you buy one Sisters record, let it be this. Following the split that gave us The Mission after 'First Last And Always', Andrew Eldritch teamed up with Patricia Morrison and Meatloaf songwriter Jim Steinman to produce what is arguably their strongest work. Packed full of huge bombastic tunes - not least the superb singles 'This Corrosion', 'Lucretia, My Reflection' and 'Dominion - and more subtler moments like 'Driven Like The Snow' and 'Never Land (a fragement)' - its a album that very much defines Goth and pretty much eclipses all others in its field. Absolutely fantastic.
 
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Old 2014-11-26, 09:49 PM   #79
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Need to give that more listens... it's First and Last that made a big impression on me.
 
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Old 2014-11-27, 08:53 AM   #80
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F,L&A is a good record, but personally I like that the Sisters really push their sound on Floodland.
 
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