Infiltration #0-6/TPB

Comics, cartoons, movies and fan stuff.
User avatar
Hound
Posts: 9639
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2000 4:00 am
Location: Henshin!

Post by Hound » Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:08 pm

Originally posted by Cliffjumper
Personally, I've rarely been one to sit down and savour artwork as it tends to break the flow of the story... For me art in a comic story has to be merely functional. Detail is good, obviously, but I'm never really going to loiter over it.
Wow, I am the complete opposite of that. My habit is to sit down with a comic and skim through it without reading the words so I can take that time to really look at the art when I'm not busy reading the words. I suppose it has the possibility to spoil what I'm about to read but often it just makes me anticipate reading the book more.

I've always thought the art is the most important part of a comic book. I think it has to be. A story is, of course, essential but the writer doesn't tell the story, the artist does. Dialogue is really so very little of what's actually happening in any story, to judge it on only that is completely unfair.

User avatar
Cliffjumper
Posts: 32206
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 5:00 am
Contact:

Post by Cliffjumper » Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:00 pm

Don't get me wrong, the art is a big part of the comic... But I think both are important. There's no point in something looking gorgeous if it's not any good... I can generally stomach a comic story where the art is barely functional, but the story is good (+/- 90% of the TF:g2 art isn't to my tastes), but do it the other way round and you have a poster book.

User avatar
Hound
Posts: 9639
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2000 4:00 am
Location: Henshin!

Post by Hound » Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:22 pm

Well, a good comic book artist isn't just someone who's drawings look nice. A good comic artist tells a story well. I mean even Jim Lee can make a crap story readable. Granted his art looks fantastic but it's mostly because he's just really good at telling a story with his art. WildC.A.T.s #5 (I think) for example. First issue after the mini and it's got all these gatefold pages and just epic scenes. Nothing remarkably gripping about the story being told but damn that issue was beautiful and told that story damn well. I love that comic.

The Sandman as another example. Most of the art in the entire series isn't what I would call pretty to look at on it's own but always fits the story being told and tells it well. Oftenly very well.

A really bad artist can completely ruin any story. Even the best writer can't make a crap artist tell his story well. Liefeld and Pat Lee for example.

User avatar
Cliffjumper
Posts: 32206
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 5:00 am
Contact:

Post by Cliffjumper » Wed Jun 07, 2006 6:37 pm

Originally posted by Hound


(1)The Sandman as another example. Most of the art in the entire series isn't what I would call pretty to look at on it's own but always fits the story being told and tells it well. Oftenly very well.

(2)A really bad artist can completely ruin any story. Even the best writer can't make a crap artist tell his story well. Liefeld and Pat Lee for example.


(1) And I'd agree that things work best when they're both working together... A great artist can make an average script good, that I can agree with.

(2) But we're talking about extremes there, aren't we? Liefield and Lee are two of the most, ah, divisive artists out there, and they also tend to work with "pet" writers. Similarly, the best writers tend to avoid prima-donna pencillers - and when they do (I'm thinking combinations like Ellis/Hitch, or Busiek/Perez, or Moore/Davis) the elements work best in symbiosis.

Like I say, those are just my preferences. I'm not going to be able to like a comic with a bad script or bad art at all. I'd probably be better disposed towards a strong script rather than strong art if I had to choose, but I wouldn't nominate anything which exceeded at one and failed at the other as a classic... radable? Yeh, probably. Years of superhero comics have basically left me with fair experience of mediocre work on both areas, and comics work best when both are good, I'm sure we can agree, so I don't see why it should have to come down to a "which would you like more?" when there are sooo many comics out there that are both well-scripted and well-realised. I just don't spend a large amount of time taking in frames in comic books.

User avatar
Commander Shockwav
Protoform
Posts: 808
Joined: Tue Feb 04, 2003 5:13 am
Location: Virginia, USA

Post by Commander Shockwav » Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:01 pm

Originally posted by Denyer
I consider it a pacing issue when little happens and, as Smooth said, things are eminently predictable. It's not that "nothing happens" in a literal sense -- there's something on those pages, whether filler dialogue or X blowing Y up. It's whether my attention's being held and I want to see what happens next. That involves pace and hooks.


Hmm, I guess we define pacing differently, because what you are calling "pacing" I'm calling "content". I can understand why you would enjoy the content of Infiltration, and not that of the Sunstorm Saga, but I still can't fathom how you can argue the pacing of Infiltration, the speed at which the story flows, is more acceptable than DW's ongoing by Mick.

I don't think the actual content of the Infiltration is that bad, which is why overall it's a decent series. However, the rate at which things are moving right now is like watching mud flow. I only hope that the damage that has occurred from the loss of impatient fans can be undone with the coming of Stormbringer, Evolutions and the one-shots.

I think when we all get the Infiltration TPB (and we all should), it will read surprisingly better in thirty minutes than it has the past six months.
I'd say so far Infiltration has largely failed on that for me. I don't think anything so far in the series has actually surprised me. Sure, a couple of bits are different, but there's been nothing that has had me going "Christ, never thought of that!".


This a true, but can we expect anything new from someone who has been writing the Transformers for over twenty years?

In a way, its quite unfair of us to expect Simon to give us something we haven't seen before. Which is why the bar has been raised in this fourth installment of the TF comic. IDW has to try and steer clear of three other takes on the Transformers + the cartoon to try and create something fresh. No easy task.

Simon loves the Transformers more than anyone. He sits up at night for hours on end thinking up new stories and fresh takes and has spent twenty years doing this. Should we be surprised to find that the mind of Mr. Furman is not an every flowing river of ideas and stories?

Bring back James McDonough and Bob Budiansky, writers who know Transformers. Give them chances to see potential where Simon cannot. It may turn out Simon is the only way to go, but we should at least tap others in search of newness, something that is in very limited supply. By bringing them back, I mean giving them a chance on the one-shots and titles like Evolutions.

User avatar
Denyer
Posts: 32156
Joined: Sun Sep 17, 2000 4:00 am
Custom Title: Shooty Dog Thing
Location: UK
Contact:

Post by Denyer » Thu Jun 08, 2006 4:41 am

By all means. I'm fired up for a Budiansky project, and it's certainly possible that McMicknyk would function better when not being their own editors, not putting out a four-part miniseries whilst fighting for paychecks behind the scenes, paired with different artists, etc. At the same time, I don't feel as if we're "stuck" with Furman, and I'm expecting different things from Stormbringer, the one-shots (and Escalation, to a reasonable degree.)

Heck, get Mike Collins in. He's around and doing the UK convention circuit these days, and Crisis of Command was an interesting chance of pace that brought new ideas (the Autobots backchatting Prime about creating "ultimate warriors" for instance.) And reprint that instead of "Rock and Roll out"...

User avatar
Denyer
Posts: 32156
Joined: Sun Sep 17, 2000 4:00 am
Custom Title: Shooty Dog Thing
Location: UK
Contact:

Post by Denyer » Thu Jun 08, 2006 5:20 am

Originally posted by Cliffjumper
To write off the first sixty issues of the Us comic as a "preview" is harsh, to be honest.
It's one in line with the popular complaint about the best TF stories being on Cybertron and not revolving around Earth or saving pesky humans. A view I share to some degree because of how badly the human context has often been written -- and not getting into the UK comic until the latter half, so I read the beginning arcs later.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
the US comic wasn't written simply to set up the Unicron war.
Which is a large part of why the Unicron war works, yeah. Entirely fair point. It was (sort of) unexpected for anyone reading the title as it had ended up... sort of because obviously the movie was out and there'd already been Legacy for UK folks...

Coming at it from another angle, the way the title had nosedived was what made it such an effective setup; it gains a boost because it's notably better, rather than been uniformly good.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
often from scratch without the associations that Furman has been able to use.
He'd be getting far less flak without going for a bunch of entrenched characters, even with differences. Send out the Protectobots and Junior Headmasters (sans Nebulans) for instance, and there'd be less "why isn't Sunstreaker breaking out and shooting things?" That comes from not having confidence to launch a main title by reaching immediately into obscurity that can then be defined, I think. Stick in First Aid as Ratchet and Groove or Blades as Bumblebee.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
Personally, I've rarely been one to sit down and savour artwork as it tends to break the flow of the story...
In some cases, it is the flow of the story, and it seems to be quite a bit here. Taking in a pan of a character's reactions developing in a second and moving to the next bit of text screws with the timing...
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
Oh, the approach can work, don't get me wrong... V for Vendetta's stripped-down action sequences, for example (the main example that leaps to mind is the fantastic moment when Almond pulls the gun on V), while dependant on the writer/artist, some of the Nuff Said Marvel issues worked, as does alot of Frank Quitely's similar stuff. It just doesn't work for Infiltration, I find.
Looking at a title they've both done, I much prefer Hitch to Quitely. And I'd much prefer Su's stuff if it were consistently coloured; he could possibly stand to be a little more dynamic versus realistic at times, but moments such as Ironhide mulling should give enough prompts for the reader to also be thinking about what's going on.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
I personally feel the approach only really works for more, erm, reverential or mysterious (I'm struggling for the right word) slower passages. For battle scenes it's rather like looking at a group of animation cels. Of course, it's possible that by this stage I'm pageturning to try and find some sort of movement, but then that surely means that I, at least, am finding this more frustrating than suspenseful?
Not so much suspense as we're getting freeze-frames of deciding moments... which with the muddy palette in the early issues over speed lines (it needs a mix of colours blurring past, otherwise they might as well be driving through iced tea) doesn't always work. I found #4 a lot better for that.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
I've re-read the likes of V and Watchmen repeatedly, and don't simply skim through the pages without dialogue or narration
I do with V -- don't actually find it very readable at all, really, having read Orwell, Huxley and a lot of other dystopian near-future stuff. Watchmen too is also very revelation based, whereas something like Sandman re-reads for the dialogue or Hitman re-"reads" for the novelty value of zombie seals. Fables is one of the other books I really enjoy leafing through for the art.

The downside of this approach is that anyone who doesn't like the art doesn't have (as) much to hold their attention.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
I'd say that's an incredibly charitable reading
Am I the only person who read the last bit as slightly mocking, then? And as far as placating goes, there are some quite pointed replies in other columns, still with the same genial tone.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
I'd say so far Infiltration has largely failed on that for me. I don't think anything so far in the series has actually surprised me. Sure, a couple of bits are different, but there's been nothing that has had me going "Christ, never thought of that!".
Have the Decepticons (the ones who are characters rather than the faceless Empire drones) ever succesfully laid waste to planets? Klo was a bit laughable, surely? Little pink things for Squeezeplay to claw at; it was purely a comedy setting.

Next up is we need to see it as well as hear it. Not everyone's going to imagine the same things from that narration.
Originally posted by Cliffjumper
Furman seems to have sat down and thought "How would Ellis or Morrison have done Transformers?"
Maybe. He seems to have it all planned out in his head, but then "Brad" did too -- we haven't been forced to get plot points and resurrections from the letters page and interviews yet (with one exception -- I don't think the Machination has been named "on-camera" so far...)

User avatar
inflatable dalek
Posts: 23936
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kidderminster UK

Post by inflatable dalek » Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:47 pm

Originally posted by Denyer
Heck, get Mike Collins in. He's around and doing the UK convention circuit these days,


And, as well as being regular artist on DWM (A non-copyright infringing Optimus Prime has a nice cameo in the current issue's strip about comic book charecters coming to life) he's also writing it in a couple of months, so he's certainly kept his oar in regular comic work in a way that Furman hasn't really outside of Transformers.
TRANSFORMATION: LOCKDOWN
MEET THE AMAZING KNUCKLEHEAD IN MY LOOK AT AOE 1!
PLUS: BUY THE BOOKS!

User avatar
Aardvark
Posts: 2107
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 11:15 am
Location: Wales? O___o

Post by Aardvark » Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:14 pm

Rope in James Hill, if not for State Games then for the sheer fanwankyness of it. I certainly would like to see him give it a go and Parkhouse.
-Alex???

User avatar
inflatable dalek
Posts: 23936
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kidderminster UK

Post by inflatable dalek » Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:17 pm

Originally posted by Aardvark
Rope in James Hill, if not for State Games then for the sheer fanwankyness of it. I certainly would like to see him give it a go and Parkhouse.


DO either of them still work in comics though? Or are they "resting" ala the Furman before Dreamwave threw him a bone?
TRANSFORMATION: LOCKDOWN
MEET THE AMAZING KNUCKLEHEAD IN MY LOOK AT AOE 1!
PLUS: BUY THE BOOKS!

User avatar
Cliffjumper
Posts: 32206
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 5:00 am
Contact:

Post by Cliffjumper » Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:32 pm

Originally posted by Denyer
It's one in line with the popular complaint about the best TF stories being on Cybertron and not revolving around Earth or saving pesky humans. A view I share to some degree because of how badly the human context has often been written -- and not getting into the UK comic until the latter half, so I read the beginning arcs later.
I'd say settings and human interaction aren't really vital ingredients... A story can transcend the sum of its' components, and those with the right ingredients can totally fail... Reading order is an interesting thing, because part of the reason I'm failing to enjoy Infiltration is because it's simply so disengaged compared to the better stories I've read... I don't think Infiltration is bad, I just don't think it's all that good - as I've said, it's the best thing we've had this side of G2, which is probably more an indictment of the various Dreamwave disappointments that it is a plus point for Infiltration - and both TF:WW mini-series looked good up to a similar point.
Which is a large part of why the Unicron war works, yeah. Entirely fair point. It was (sort of) unexpected for anyone reading the title as it had ended up... sort of because obviously the movie was out and there'd already been Legacy for UK folks...
I'd say it's an example of goalposts being moved, and probably someone taking the series a lot more seriously... the thing about the Marvel material is that you've always got to take into account that it was just another job for Bob, but for Furman it's been a lot more of a life's work (possibly for his general inability to adapt to anything else?)... I dunno, it's like calling Stormwatch a preview for The Authority. It's a bit of a disservice to earlier material to tar it all with one brush simply because something 'better' (the Unicron war, IMHO, works much better summarised than when sitting down and plodding through a meandering, pothole-filled block of twenty issues... being able to remember the contributions to the ongoing plot from "Rhythms" or "Human Factor" or the entire turgid mess of "Matrix Quest" enables the reader to simply skip some very ropey comics) later came along. Infiltration is marketed as a series in its' own right, but unlike the first sixty issues of the US comic has yet to show us it has a story/stories of its' own to tell.
That comes from not having confidence to launch a main title by reaching immediately into obscurity that can then be defined, I think. Stick in First Aid as Ratchet and Groove or Blades as Bumblebee.
I'm not saying it's not the best approach, but let's be honest, Ratchet and Bumblebee are largely in their Furman USA incarnations, simply with some of the experience stripped away because they've never sabotaged Megatron's base or been on a Matrix Quest. Aside from the odd line to reaffirm that these are their characters they've been given little actual development - we're left to join the dots. In essence the basic characters are know to us and that's most of the work done... To suggest much more is to encroach on the territory of the insane G1 fanboys/girls who can extrapolate a thesis on Thundercracker's life from a couple of functionary lines in a cartoon episode.
In some cases, it is the flow of the story, and it seems to be quite a bit here. Taking in a pan of a character's reactions developing in a second and moving to the next bit of text screws with the timing...
See, my problem is that it takes a mixed approach... one minute we've having action spread across three pages, then we have a page where the speech bubbles are all squeezed into frames like veal.
Looking at a title they've both done, I much prefer Hitch to Quitely.
I'd agree with that... Quitely's eye for composition is probably just about better (though I've read very little of his that wasn't written by Morrison), but Hitch's technical skills are simply phenominal.
Am I the only person who read the last bit as slightly mocking, then? And as far as placating goes, there are some quite pointed replies in other columns, still with the same genial tone.
I'd again say that you're giving the guy a fair bit of benefit of the doubt. All said and done, though, I fail to see why they bothered printing the letter, rather than one which diverged from OP's usual schtick of "I'm a soldier and I legally changed my name to Optimus Prime".
Have the Decepticons (the ones who are characters rather than the faceless Empire drones) ever succesfully laid waste to planets? Klo was a bit laughable, surely? Little pink things for Squeezeplay to claw at; it was purely a comedy setting.
They certainly have in a lot of fan-fiction, and outside of that we generally see them in a very narrow focus - on Earth or Cybertron (and let's be honest, they didn't do a bad job on the second one). I'd say putting them in a position of considerable power is a very simple twist only about on a par with "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" (the invasion has happened instead of simply being imminent). It's a pretty straightforward move.
Maybe. He seems to have it all planned out in his head, but then "Brad" did too -- we haven't been forced to get plot points and resurrections from the letters page and interviews yet (with one exception -- I don't think the Machination has been named "on-camera" so far...)


Again, though, I feel Infiltration should be giving me a bit more than "it's not as bad as Dreamwave". And while I'm no big fan of the ongoing, you have to point out that the IDW G1 universe could be left looking just as fractal and untidy if the axe was to fall in a few issues' time without the storytelling becoming a bit less vague.

User avatar
Aardvark
Posts: 2107
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 11:15 am
Location: Wales? O___o

Post by Aardvark » Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:35 pm

Not sure about Hill but Parkhouse has continued to work {2000 AD, Milkman Murders, Hellboy, Sandman} lost of other good stuff. Though he's doing much more artwork then writing.
-Alex???

User avatar
Prowl1984
Posts: 2389
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2004 4:29 am
Location: What would Deadpool do?

Post by Prowl1984 » Mon Jun 12, 2006 10:47 pm

i don't understand why people are still p*ssed off with this arc.
yeah it was slow to start but it's picking up a fairly decent pace, a respectable one that i'm enjoying. the human characters are annoying but as was quoted on the letters page they're quintessential to the story, without the human perspective the fact that there are big F*ck off giant robots from another world hiding on our planet is kinda lost. the sparse use of characters is great too, it's alot better than the first few issues of the marvel run when it was a case of "look here's a new transformer! and another one! and even more! look you can take the heads off these ones!" it gives us something to look forward to when we only get a handful of characters...although i am dreading the "Optimus Prime saves the day" scenario that may very well happen, but even then i kinda have my doubts that it will
Image

"No point in long goodbyes, here's the door."

"Life's a trip, and then you die" -
Hunter S.Thompson
1937-2005 :smokin:

User avatar
LKW
Protoform
Posts: 812
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:09 pm
Location: fray-adjacent

Post by LKW » Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:42 pm

Well, I finally got to my regular comic book store and picked up the contents of my pull box (and a few other things). Read this issue, and this discussion thread (and the one for #4, too)...

Personally, I thought that this issue was an improvement over #4, which I had found to be perhaps the most disappointing issue so far. In #5, we learned what the Decepticons have been up to, and that Megatron is indeed here to stop them. More characterization for both the Autobots and Decepts, a little more for the humans; a nice fight scene. I liked Blitzwing's bit about "What we did here, well, it DESERVES to be buried. I dunno, we... ...STOPPED being Decepticons, I guess." Megatron's being pretty taciturn, but he's been set up as a fearsome threat, and certainly doesn't seem to have the sorry temperament of the G1 Marvel version.

OTOH... I agree that not that much has really happened for almost-six issues of content. And this issue is a quick read. Honestly, I counted the pages earlier, because I was having a hard time believing that there were actually twenty-two of them there. And having Optimus Prime just pop up and solve everything in one issue would not likely be a satisfying conclusion. Although... maybe Prime's apperance will be the event that ends this arc...

Overall, I guess I'm still pretty optimistic about this new start for the Transformers concept. Furman's found a pretty interesting approach (as long as the humans remain side characters) - and some fresh scripting, as well; some of the dialogue, especially in #0 and #1, has been very different from the Furman feel that I've recognized in TF and other Furman work in the past. That has impressed me. Hopefully, Skywarp will turn out all right (and Blitzwing, too; but Warper seemed to get the worst of it, and he is one of my more favorite characters), Megatron's fusion cannon will get its classic look when he gets the gun mode people seem to have read somewhere that he will be getting, and the series will move on to have a diverse group of TFs engaged in various stories, including some less "cinematically" presented ones.

User avatar
Aardvark
Posts: 2107
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 11:15 am
Location: Wales? O___o

Post by Aardvark » Mon Jun 26, 2006 12:43 am

Now I freely admit that I lean more towards the pessimistic end of the spectrum rather than that shiny, happier optimistic end (Which I someday hope to visit) but still; the last issue was an extremely swift read as were the previous issues for the most part. If the next issue is to follow that trend then we have to fit in a super-powered Starscream, the fight scene with the Battlechargers, the obligatory recap, some sort of resolution, a fair bit of time devoted to the humans, also I doubt Astrotrain will get off scot-free, Megs acting huffy, a bigger fight scene, a load of jibber-jabber and *shudder* who's silhouette is that...

I have a bad, bad feeling that #6 will not be the almighty issue that ties together the series (Resulting in a spiffy TPB) that will convert those unsure about Infiltration to the temple of Furman. Still if it is a big blowout everyone can have a big go at (Which incidentally is tremendous fun)

Everyone in the Transformers comic biz owes a big thank you to Mr Lee for taking some of the heat off them (for the foreseeable future it would seem) ;)
-Alex???

User avatar
inflatable dalek
Posts: 23936
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kidderminster UK

Post by inflatable dalek » Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:24 pm

Originally posted by Aardvark
Now I freely admit that I lean more towards the pessimistic end of the spectrum rather than that shiny, happier optimistic end (Which I someday hope to visit)


I wouldn't bother, it's probably rubish there.
TRANSFORMATION: LOCKDOWN
MEET THE AMAZING KNUCKLEHEAD IN MY LOOK AT AOE 1!
PLUS: BUY THE BOOKS!

User avatar
Cliffjumper
Posts: 32206
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 5:00 am
Contact:

Post by Cliffjumper » Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:42 pm

Originally posted by Aardvark
Everyone in the Transformers comic biz owes a big thank you to Mr Lee for taking some of the heat off them (for the foreseeable future it would seem) ;)


Brilliant, isn't it? However well IDW's promotion machine is going (we have people proclaiming they'll buy multiple covers just to keep their execs in lattes, and others claiming they'll give the G1 book three whole arcs before even considering it might not be top banana), they could not have done a better job than the one DW did for them. It's amazing how many more people hate Pat's artwork now they know he stiffed over God Figueroa.

Incidentally, what are James and Adam scripting now? Ultimate X-Men? JLA? Batman?

User avatar
inflatable dalek
Posts: 23936
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kidderminster UK

Post by inflatable dalek » Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:46 pm

Originally posted by Cliffjumper
It's amazing how many more people hate Pat's artwork now they know he stiffed over God Figueroa.


Did anyone ever really love Da SUHPAHSTARS artwork that much? "Better than James Ng" (The poor mans Pat Lee) is hardly a reccomendation...
TRANSFORMATION: LOCKDOWN
MEET THE AMAZING KNUCKLEHEAD IN MY LOOK AT AOE 1!
PLUS: BUY THE BOOKS!

User avatar
Cliffjumper
Posts: 32206
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2001 5:00 am
Contact:

Post by Cliffjumper » Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:03 pm

Read the responses in the "Dreamwave Disaster" thread in Junkion Files, or do a post search for user "Ishin Okani" (I think). Note how some of the former are members who go for cheap Pat Lee shots nowadays...

User avatar
LKW
Protoform
Posts: 812
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:09 pm
Location: fray-adjacent

Post by LKW » Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:06 pm

Originally posted by Aardvark
...we have to fit in a super-powered Starscream, the fight scene with the Battlechargers, the obligatory recap, some sort of resolution, a fair bit of time devoted to the humans, also I doubt Astrotrain will get off scot-free, Megs acting huffy, a bigger fight scene, a load of jibber-jabber and *shudder* who's silhouette is that...

I have a bad, bad feeling that #6 will not be the almighty issue that ties together the series (Resulting in a spiffy TPB) that will convert those unsure about Infiltration to the temple of Furman.


Well, when you put it that way... :)

There is a lot of pressure on issue #6 to actually present some sort of a proper ending to this first story arc. It is just the sixth issue (well, seventh) of IDW's on-going Transformers series - the first issue of Escalation will be "#7", not another #1, right? (Or am I completely wrong in that impression?) By adding these individual titles, delineating story arcs, IDW has created an expectation of a story conclusion that wouldn't necessarily be leveled at all #6 issues of on-going series. And as you point out, Aardvark, they do seem to have a lot to accomplish in twenty two pages. Obviously, they can't tie up everything that's going on; but some reason has to be given to say, "Well, 'Infiltration' is over. Now we really are someplace new."

Post Reply